What Is Tōkidenshō Angel Eyes And Why Are People Excited About It?

Tōkidenshō Angel Eyes is coming to Switch and PS4 via Arcade Archives on October 20th. Not only is Angel Eyes coming to home consoles, but that it is finally coming home. Announced on Sept 10th 2020, it has been over two years with no update as to where the release is. This, alongside the similarly-updatedless Complete Edition of Daraku Tenshi, was considered to be possibly dead in the water by some given the radio silence after its initial announcement. But now that we have a date to expect it on; what is Tōkidenshō Angel Eyes and why are people so excited to see a home console port of it show up?

Advanced Variable Geo 2: Flying Family Restaurant Rumble

At first blush AVG2 may not seem particularly special; a perfectly good looking PS1 fighter with cute anime girls utilizing a four-button system and a 3 bar super meter, it’s a little stock standard for the genre at this point. But when you dig under the surface of AVG2, you discover a game that is not only incredibly tight to play but features so many unique design decisions that few fighting games have ever followed in. Advanced Variable Geo 2 is packed to the gills with mechanical systems and character designs that are not only off the beaten path compared to its contemporaries, but would also not be seen moving forward.

Indie Fighting Prototypes – Shuzen (朱漸)

In my continuous search for new indie fighting games to play, I often find projects in very early stages of development. Many of them show promising new mechanics and fresh ideas, but they are not ripe enough for a regular review. Sometimes, graphics are just sketched placeholders. Or, maybe, there is no music or sound effects. Or, at times, the only playable mode is local multiplayer, with no AI implemented.

However, I believe there is value in talking about games in their infancy, therefore, I am inaugurating this new series of articles dedicated to fighting game prototypes, tech demos and early builds! These articles will be shorter than my usual reviews and will focus more on what the game brings to the table and less on their overall presentation.

This week, we start with the game that acted as an inspiration for this column: the promising Shuzen (朱漸), made by Japanese developer 莉琉 (Mariru), who is also an active artist on Skeb.

Battle Craze!! – all good things come in threes

This is not the first time I cover a game made with the Ikemen GO engine. Previously, I have talked quite a lot about TMNTxJL Turbo and—in an article I still need to port to this venue—the incredible The Black Heart. However, for some inexplicable reasons, Ikemen original IPs tend to be rarer and farther between than those made with that coelacanth called 2D Fighter Maker 2002. This despite Ikemen GO having built-in delay netcode (with the core developers painstakingly working on implementing GGPO as we speak) and being much more flexible in terms of what one can and cannot do with it.

Battle Craze!! is a game that uses all the good features Ikemen offers to an astonishing level and—while it doesn’t provide the amount of content TMNTxJL Turbo put on the table—it shows very convincingly what can be done with this engine, and which level of variety can be achieved with it.

Resistance 204X – a cyberpunk spiritual successor to Nidhogg

I have stumbled upon Resistance 204X for the first time on Reddit. The flashy presentation, the fast movement and the “defeat your opponent until you can reach the goal post at the correct side of the stage” made for a very compelling first impression. The gameplay trailer later that month “sold” it even more. But I honestly had my doubts—was the game going to be style over substance or was it going to satisfy those expectations?
After playing the sign-up beta, I can answer that question with a resounding “Yes, Resistance 204X delivers exactly what it promises”.

Duels of Fortune – air-dashing action between simplicity and openness

Duels of Fortune is, under many points of view, a sort of singularity in the current fighting game panorama. Its cartoony, cel-shaded 3D style stands out even as a part of the indie scene and its focus on single player content is nothing short of a black swan. With its quirky cast of unique characters, simple controls but a relatively high skill ceiling, it’s a game that compensates the lack of online modes with a lot of nuance in the offline gameplay offer.

Fight of Steel: Infinity Warrior – Review

Fight of Steel: Infinity Warrior is a great indie fighting game which does almost everything right. With huge amounts of replayability, customization options, and snappy gameplay, it’s a must buy in the current scene, especially for its budget price—less than 13USD. Its flaws can be overlooked quite easily, the online modes work reasonably well and the UI, while obnoxious, isn’t a huge barrier to enjoying the game. This game feels like a huge step forward for the Digital Crafter formula and shines as an example of what a good indie fighting game should aspire to be.

52Beatup – believe in the heart of the cards!

What do you get when you mix a simplified, high-damage fighting game with a deckbuilding mechanic relying on randomness and choosing the best (or less worst) option on the flight? 52Beatup answers this question, putting on the table one of the most refreshingly unique indie fighting game experiences of the last few years.

DNF Duel Review

As if someone somewhere deep within the bowels of Nexon’s corporate machine finally said “there should be a fighting game about that”, DNF Duel is a 2D fighting game based on the characters and world of long-running smash hit MMO Dungeon Fighter Online. While adapting belt scrolling action to traditional fighting formulas is not new, publisher Nexon has teamed up with fighting game powerhouse Arc System Works & fighting game funnymen Eighting Co. to produce an undeniably unique title. Does it all work and is there enough here to please? Let’s get on with the review and find out.

Fight of Animals – greater than the sum of its parts

Fight of Animals is a weird beast to describe. Digital Crafter went from Jesus cross-ups to meme animals brawling in the span of just one year, but the level of additional polish Fight of Animals reached in such a small time (less than nine months between the two games) is stellar.
I’m not sure what the budget for Fight of Animals was, but all things considered there is an air of “doing the most with the smallest investment” that I can’t help but commend. This aura permeates the whole game and it’s equally charming and intriguing, especially under the lens of another developer.
One could think that such a downsized title cannot be that deep. However, they’d be totally wrong, because what’s left is more than enough and is the core of a very compelling fighting game experience—with a solid competitive community and an upcoming Vortex Gallery tournament in August!